Comparison Contrast Poetry Essay

Comparison Contrast Poetry Essay-74
Both poems cry out for civil rights and equality in a time where African-Americans were treated neither civilly nor equally.The Aesthetic Movement, as exemplified by The Indian to His Love, by W. Yeats, seems lifeless and insipid when compared to his The Hosting of the Sidhe.

Both poems cry out for civil rights and equality in a time where African-Americans were treated neither civilly nor equally.The Aesthetic Movement, as exemplified by The Indian to His Love, by W. Yeats, seems lifeless and insipid when compared to his The Hosting of the Sidhe.

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By using words like "I" and "them", "me" and "you," the speaker is able to point out the differences between himself and his teacher. As I learn from you, I guess you learn from me— (31-38).Unlike the first poem, "I" is used here to connote strength and singularity.The speaker, an African-American student given an English writing assignment, engages his teacher in an intelligent, even pointed dialog.His poems "I, Too" and "Theme for English B" both advanced his political views of equal civil rights and treatment under the law for African-Americans.Both poems use first-person voices; however the "I" is different for each poem, in order to fulfill Hughes' purpose for the poem.There is little relationship between the characters of The Indian to His Love and those of The Hosting of the Sidhe.In the former, Yeats deals exclusively with mortals, idealized perhaps, but nonetheless mortals who must deal with the world as mortals: Here we will moor our lovely ship/ And wander ever with woven hands," and.Additionally, the depiction of action is different in the two poems.In The Indian to his Love, Yeats makes no attempt to suggest action beyond the most static activity: And wander ever with woven hands,/ Murmuring softly lip to lip. There are no winds, no storms, and no passions on Yeats island, only tranquility.However, this is not the only way that Hughes uses "I" in his poetry.On the other hand, Hughes' poem "Theme for English B," uses the first-person voice for an entirely different effect. The poem is written like a narrative: "I am twenty-two, colored, born in Winston-Salem" (7).

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