Incomplete Homework

Incomplete Homework-53
At the end of the 19th century, attendance in grades 1 through 4 was irregular for many students, and most classrooms were multi-age.Teachers rarely gave homework to primary students (Gill & Schlossman, 2004).

At the end of the 19th century, attendance in grades 1 through 4 was irregular for many students, and most classrooms were multi-age.Teachers rarely gave homework to primary students (Gill & Schlossman, 2004).

Many school districts across the United States voted to abolish homework, especially in the lower grades: In the 1930s and 1940s, although few districts abolished homework outright, many abolished it in grades K–6.

In grades K–3, condemnation of homework was nearly universal in school district policies as well as professional opinion.

In 1900, the editor of the Ladies' Home Journal, Edward Bok, began a series of anti-homework articles.

He recommended the elimination of homework for all students under the age of 15 and a limit of one hour nightly for older students.

(The research on homework is discussed in Chapter 3.) Although many people remain staunchly in favor of homework, a growing number of teachers and parents alike are beginning to question the practice.

These critics are reexamining the beliefs behind the practice, the wisdom of assigning hours of homework, the absurdly heavy backpack, and the failure that can result when some students don't complete homework.

Simple tasks of memorization and practice were easy for children to do at home, and the belief was that such mental exercise disciplined the mind. schools has evolved from the once simple tasks of memorizing math facts or writing spelling words to complex projects.

Homework has generally been viewed as a positive practice and accepted without question as part of the student routine. As the culture has changed, and as schools and families have changed, homework has become problematic for more and more students, parents, and teachers.

Early in the 20th century, an anti-homework movement became the centerpiece of a nationwide trend toward progressive education.

Progressive educators questioned many aspects of schooling: "Once the value of drill, memorization, and recitation was opened to debate, the attendant need for homework came under harsh scrutiny as well" (Kralovec & Buell, 2000, p. As the field of pediatrics grew, more doctors began to speak out about the effect of homework on the health and well-being of children.

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