Jean Piaget Research Paper

Jean Piaget Research Paper-83
Shaking a rattle would be the combination of two schemas, grasping and shaking.A 2-year-old child sees a man who is bald on top of his head and has long frizzy hair on the sides.

The schema is a stored form of the pattern of behavior which includes looking at a menu, ordering food, eating it and paying the bill.

This is an example of a type of schema called a 'script.' Whenever they are in a restaurant, they retrieve this schema from memory and apply it to the situation.

Children construct an understanding of the world around them, then experience discrepancies between what they already know and what they discover in their environment.

Imagine what it would be like if you did not have a mental model of your world.

Piaget believed that newborn babies have a small number of innate schemas - even before they have had many opportunities to experience the world.

These neonatal schemas are the cognitive structures underlying innate reflexes. For example, babies have a sucking reflex, which is triggered by something touching the baby's lips.

Piaget emphasized the importance of schemas in cognitive development and described how they were developed or acquired.

A schema can be defined as a set of linked mental representations of the world, which we use both to understand and to respond to situations.

Indeed, it is useful to think of schemas as “units” of knowledge, each relating to one aspect of the world, including objects, actions, and abstract (i.e., theoretical) concepts.

Wadsworth (2004) suggests that schemata (the plural of schema) be thought of as 'index cards' filed in the brain, each one telling an individual how to react to incoming stimuli or information.

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