Thesis Statement About Human Cloning

Thesis Statement About Human Cloning-50
Chapter 6 contains the panel’s findings and recommendations. “It’s a busy morning in the cloning laboratory of the big-city hospital. In nine months, the parents, who face the very likely prospect of losing the one daughter they have, could find themselves raising two of her–the second created expressively to keep the first alive” (Kluger p. This is just one of the many scenarios people are imagining after the successful cloning–manipulating a cell from an animal so that it grows into an exact duplicate of that animal–of the sheep, Dolly.Chapter 2 provides a basic introduction to cloning and its relation to stem cell research.

Chapter 6 contains the panel’s findings and recommendations. “It’s a busy morning in the cloning laboratory of the big-city hospital. In nine months, the parents, who face the very likely prospect of losing the one daughter they have, could find themselves raising two of her–the second created expressively to keep the first alive” (Kluger p. This is just one of the many scenarios people are imagining after the successful cloning–manipulating a cell from an animal so that it grows into an exact duplicate of that animal–of the sheep, Dolly.Chapter 2 provides a basic introduction to cloning and its relation to stem cell research.

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“Cloning” is achieved commonly in the world of horticulture by, for example, providing a branch or stem of a plant with water and the right environmental conditions and producing a new plant that is a clone, or genetically identical copy, of the original plant.

In human reproduction, cloning occurs naturally when identical twins are produced.

Chapter 4 reviews the panel’s understanding of relevant assisted reproductive technologies. Cloning Human Beings, Volume I: Report and Recommendations of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission.

Chapter 5 describes the plans of those who wish to clone humans and provides the current policy and regulatory context.

Like reproductive cloning, the process of nuclear transplantation to produce stem cells (also called “therapeutic cloning, nonreproductive cloning, or research cloning”) involves placing the DNA from one mammal into an enucleated egg (an egg from which the chromosomes have been removed). At the blastocyst stage of embryonic development (in humans, a 5-7 day old preimplantation embryo of about 150 cells), its inner cell mass is harvested and grown in culture for subsequent derivation of embryonic stem cells.

These cells are then used for scientific and clinical investigations.The NBAC’s report, [2], came to various conclusions, including the following (emphasis added): “The Commission concludes that at this time it is morally unacceptable for anyone in the public or private sector, whether in a research or clinical setting, to attempt to create a child using somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning.The Commission reached a consensus on this point because current scientific information indicates that this technique is not safe to use in humans at this point.Mammals of five species—sheep, mice, pigs, goats, and cattle—have now been successfully cloned from adult or fetal cells, and attempts are being made (so far without success) to clone monkeys, dogs, horses, and other animals in the same way.The cloning of mammals involves a process called nuclear transplantation or somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT).Scientists clone DNA (“molecular cloning”) so that they have large quantities of identical copies of DNA for scientific experiments.Cloning of adult animals, known as reproductive cloning, has become relatively widespread since the report of the birth of Dolly the sheep in 1997; Dolly was the first clone of a mammal produced from an adult cell.If we’re running out of time, we might say that we wish we had a clone that could help us accomplish all our tasks.When biologists use the word , they are talking specifically about DNA molecules, cells, or whole plants or animals that have the same genetic makeup.Indeed, the Commission believes it would violate important ethical obligations were clinicians or researchers to attempt to create a child using these particular technologies, which are likely to involve unacceptable risks to the fetus and/or potential child.Moreover, in addition to safety concerns, many other serious ethical concerns have been identified, which require much more widespread and careful public deliberation before this technology may be used.” The commission recommended, in part, the following: Other countries are also considering the issues and determining their policies.

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